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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

26 May

Gender Influences on Fatherhood

Fathers' brains respond differently to daughters than sons, new study finds.

25 May

Sleep and Heart Disease

Too little sleep may increase the risk of death in people with certain heart disease risk factors, study finds.

24 May

Apnea and A-Fib

Sleep apnea may increase atrial fibrillation risk, new study says

Diesel Pollution May Damage the Heart

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Pollution from diesel engines may cause heart damage, a British study suggests.

"There is strong evidence that particulate matter emitted mainly from diesel road vehicles is associated with increased risk of heart attack, heart failure and death," said lead author Dr. Nay Aung, a cardiologist an...

Bystander CPR Helps Save Brain Function After Near-Drowning

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Near-drowning victims are more likely to recover with good brain function if bystanders immediately begin chest compressions rather than wait for emergency personnel to arrive, researchers report.

"What we found is that when bystanders begin CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation] before emergency ...

Warming Climate, More Sleepless Nights?

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The rising nighttime temperatures that come with climate change could mean poorer sleep for millions, a new study suggests.

Americans' reported nights of insufficient sleep more than double as nighttime temperatures rise during summer months, an analysis of federal health data and weather record...

Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression appears to raise the risk of falls in elderly people, but the proper dose of psychiatric medication may eliminate that risk, a new study suggests.

"Many interventions to prevent falls are expensive and time-intensive, but this is a simple and inexpensive matter of encouraging continue...

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One Man's Trash Is Another's Fiber

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Wasted food results in a huge loss of important nutrients for Americans, new research contends.

"Huge quantities of nutritious foods end up in landfills instead of meeting Americans' dietary needs," said study lead author Marie Spiker, a fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future in...

Promising Results for Drug to Fight Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug might help ease the pain and disability of a form of arthritis often linked to psoriasis.

According to Stanford University researchers, psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory joint disorder tied to an out-of-control immune response. The disease affects about one in every 200 people an...

Gut Bacteria Changes After Some Weight-Loss Surgeries

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A type of weight-loss surgery -- called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass -- triggers major changes in the microbial population of the digestive tract, a new study finds.

Specifically, the procedure leads to increased diversity of bacteria in the gut, and a microbial population distinct from obese and no...

Could a Century-Old Drug Help Ease Autism Symptoms?

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A drug first used in the early 1900s to treat sleeping sickness has shown promise in an early trial as a potential treatment for autism.

The study involved just 10 boys, aged 5 to 14, with autism. This was the first human trial to attempt to replicate encouraging results seen in work with mice, ...

5 Food Groups to Jump-Start Nutrition

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most Americans still don't eat enough nutrient-rich foods from key groups including vegetables, fruits, whole grains and low-fat dairy, according to federal health statistics.

And they take in too many refined grains, saturated fats, added sugars and salt.

What to do? Here are 5 types ...

Scientists Report Progress on Genetic Test for Anal Cancer

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new genetic test may detect anal cancer, a disease that's become more common in women, gay and bisexual men, and people with HIV.

"If other studies confirm and build upon these findings, this promising research could be used to develop a less invasive method to help doctors identify people who...

Hospital 'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS in Newborns

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Child care experts say it's dangerous for infants to sleep in the same bed with their parents. Now, researchers report that "baby boxes" and parent education can help reduce the unsafe practice.

Bed-sharing is linked with sleep-related deaths in babies, including sudden infant death syndrome (SI...

Adults Who Love Exercise May Gain 9 'Biological' Years

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Could regular, strenuous exercise be a "fountain of youth"? New research suggests it could be -- for your cells, at least.

"Just because you're 40 doesn't mean you're 40 years old biologically," said Larry Tucker, a professor of exercise science at Brigham Young University in Utah.

"We...

Kidneys From Deceased Diabetics Might Ease Organ Shortage: Study

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kidneys from deceased diabetic donors can save the lives of patients on the transplant wait-list, researchers say.

For the study, investigators compared U.S. data from more than 8,100 recipients of kidneys from deceased diabetic donors with data from people on the kidney transplant wait-list. ...

Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As more baby boomers age, deaths from Alzheimer's disease have jumped 55 percent, and in a quarter of those cases the heavy burden of caregiving has fallen on loved ones, U.S. health officials report.

"Alzheimer's disease is a public health problem that affects not only people with Alzheimer'...

New Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key Gene

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New gene-based therapies appear to significantly decrease cholesterol levels in people, and could even cut down on arterial plaque, according to results from two early drug trials.

Both treatments improve the body's ability to break down cholesterol by targeting a specific gene that inhibits t...

Stroke Risk Can Rise With Pregnancy-Linked High Blood Pressure

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Several factors raise the risk of pregnancy-related stroke in women with preeclampsia, a new study suggests.

Preeclampsia is a condition marked by high blood pressure and protein in a pregnant woman's urine. It affects between 3 percent and 8 percent of pregnancies. Women with preeclampsia are...

Special Diets, Supplements for Autism Still a Question Mark

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with autism often try diet changes or supplements to ease symptoms of the disorder, but a new review concludes there's no solid evidence that any work.

After analyzing 19 clinical trials, researchers found little proof that dietary tactics -- from gluten-free foods to fish ...

Eye Problems May Be Tied to Zika, Lab Study Suggests

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists exploring how the Zika virus passes from pregnant monkeys to their fetuses believe the infection may be more dangerous to human pregnancies than previously believed.

"The results we're seeing in monkey pregnancies make us think that, as they grow, more human babies might develop Zi...

Autism's 'Worryingly' High Suicide Rates Spur Conference

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High rates of suicide among people with autism are drawing specialists to a conference this week in England.

"What relatively little we know about suicidality in autism points to a worryingly high prevalence of people with the condition contemplating and attempting to take their own life," sai...

U.S. Moms-to-Be Often Victims of Assault

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Violence is common in pregnancy, with mothers-to-be in the United States at greater risk for assault-related injuries and death than women who aren't expecting, a new study finds.

"The striking results of our study suggest that widespread screening for violence and trauma during pregnancy may ...

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